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How To Blend Layers by Using Composite Methods

A layers composite method controls how it interacts with the underlying image. You can change composite methods to create special effects without changing the actual images that make up a document.

Corel Painter provides two types of composite settings:

Composite Method sets the standard composite method.

Composite Depth controls how a layers image data interacts with depth information on the canvas and other layers.

For example, if the canvas contains Impasto brushstrokes, the Composite Depth setting determines what happens when these brushstrokes intersect with brushstrokes on the layer.

You can set a different composite method for every layer in a document. Keep in mind the role of the underlying image in creating an effectyou might achieve an unexpected result if the underlying image is solid black or white.

The best way to understand the different composite methods is by seeing them in action. Quickly cycle through a layers composite method to create new and interesting versions of your image. For a comparison of Corel Painter composite methods and Adobe PhotoShop blend modes, see Saving Files That Contain Layers.

The available composite methods are described in the following table:

Composite method:

Default

The layer covers and hides the underlying image.

Example:

Gel

The Gel method tints the underlying image with the layers color. For example, a yellow layer gives the underlying image a yellow cast.

Corel Painter automatically sets a layers composite method to Gel if you paint on it with a brush that uses the Buildup method.

Example:

GelCover

The GelCover method uses a combination of the Default method and the Gel method. The edges of the layers content tint the underlying image with their color (the Gel method). The rest of the layer covers the underlying image (Default method).

If you save a file that uses a GelCover composite method layer to the PSD file format, the GelCover information will be lost.

Example:

Colorize

The Colorize method replaces the hue and saturation of the canvas pixels with the hue and saturation of the layer pixels.

You can use this feature to convert a color image to grayscale, or a grayscale image to color. A black layer turns the underlying color image into a grayscale image. A colored layer adds color to an underlying grayscale image.

Example:

Reverse-Out

In the Reverse-Out method, the layer inverts the colors beneath it. This method is a great way to remove text. Place a layer over black text to turn it white.

A colors inverse, also known as its complementary color, is the color on the opposite side of the color wheel.

With Reverse-Out, the colors in the layer are ignored; the layer content becomes transparent and reveals the inverse of the colors beneath it.

Example:


Shadow Map

Shadow Map blocks light, letting you create shadows without changing the image.

Example:

Magic Combine

In the Magic Combine method, the layer is combined with the underlying image based on luminance. The parts of the layer that are lighter than the underlying image are visible. The parts that are darker are replaced by the lighter area of the underlying image.

One way to use this method is to fill text. With a photograph as the top layer and black text as the underlying image, choosing Magic Combine fills the text with the image.

Example:

Pseudocolor

The Pseudocolor method translates the layers luminance into hue. You can use this method to turn a grayscale layer into a spectrum of color.

Example:


Normal

The Normal method works like the Default method; the layer covers the underlying image. The Normal method is the default mode in Photoshop.

Example:

Dissolve

Dissolve combines the image color with the layer color based on opacity.

Example:

Multiply

Multiply combines colors to create a darker color.

Example:

Screen

Screen combines colors to create a lighter color.

Example:

Overlay

Overlay combines colors while preserving the highlights and shadows of the image color.

Example:

Soft Light

Soft Light darkens or lightens colors depending on the luminance of the layer color.

Example:

Hard Light

Hard Light multiplies or screen colors, depending on the luminance of the layer color.

Example:

Darken

Darken colors with the image color or the layer colorwhichever is darker.

Example:

Lighten

Lighten colors with the image color or the layer colorwhichever is lighter

Example:

Difference

Difference subtracts one color from the other, depending on which color has a greater brightness value.

Example:

Hue

Hue creates a color by combining the luminance and saturation of the image color with the hue of the layer color.

Example:

Saturation

Saturation creates a color by combining the luminance and hue of the image color with the saturation of the layer color.

Example:

Color

Color creates a new color by combining the luminance of the image color with the hue and saturation of the layer color. This method is the opposite of Luminosity.

Example:

Luminosity

Luminosity creates a new color from the hue and saturation of the image color and the luminance of the layer color. This method is the opposite of Color.

Example:

 

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