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Why does DVD Copy or iVideoToGo tell me I have unsupported content when I try to copy a DVD?

When trying to copy a DVD and choosing a source, one may get the error that "This location does not contain supported content. Please try another location!"

Copy Protected DVDs


This error message will most often occur when a copy protected DVD is used as a Source to copy from. Our programs cannot duplicate or reconvert copy protected DVDs. Please see the following article for more information:


Answer ID: 000011076 Copy Protection


Answer ID: 000011077 CSS Encryption

 

Regular Video DVDs


However, if the DVD is not copy protected, it may be a sign that the DVD is corrupted/damaged or created in a non standard format. DVDs created from Digital Video Recorders (DVRs) are a good example of sources that may be create unsupported content.


It may be possible to recover and work with videos from these DVDs.


1) The first method involves clicking the "Browse Source" button. On the "Copy DVD" screen, it is the button that looks like a magnifying glass with a folder behind it. In the new window, under My Computer, open up the Drive that contains the source DVD, and left click on the folder named "VIDEO_TS" and hit Okay. If there is no mention that there is no supported content in this location, one does not have to continue on to step two.


Supported DVDs contain a folder named "VIDEO_TS". Any DVD that does not contain a "VIDEO_TS" folder is not a true Video DVD that can be converted normally with either of the steps listed here.


2) The second option requires a portion of the DVD to be copied to the hard drive.


Copying the "VIDEO_TS" folder to your hard drive will allow us to work with the video files. One will not be able to use this method with copy protected DVDs.


Within the copied "VIDEO_TS" folders will be a series of VOB files which are the Video OBject files, for example VTS_01_1.VOB. It is possible that the we may not see the extension VOB on any files.

  • In Windows XP, one can view file extensions within Windows Explorer (for example the "My Documents" window) by clicking on the Tools menu, and picking "Folder Options", and clicking on the View Tab. Make sure "Hide Extensions for Known File Types" is unchecked.
  • Under Windows Vista, within Windows Explorer, one can click on the Organize button, and then "Search and Folder Options", and clicking on the View Tab. Uncheck "Hide Extensions for Known File Types".


Once we see the file extension .VOB on the files, we can right click on those files and rename them so that instead they end with the extension ‘.MPG"


With that done, we can convert the files by adding them in the "File to DVD" section of our program. This method works because the VOB files used with DVDs are specialized MPEG2 files that we are compatible with.


If there are further errors trying to work with the newly named .MPG files, at least several of the videos themselves are corrupt and unusable.

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